Leaves in ponds

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Leaves in ponds

Garden pond

Garden pond

Leaves in ponds

Autumn is a great time of year when all the leaves on the trees are changing colour and they add an extra burst of colour to our gardens and the countryside when many of the colourful flowers have disappeared. Of course everything has a downside, and the problem with the leaves changing colour is that it means they are about fall to the ground.

I have a lovely cherry tree in my wildlife garden and when it flowers in spring it looks beautiful, but when I installed my pond a few years ago I had no option other than to place the pond not far from the tree as my garden is quite small. So every year when the leaves turn and fall, and the wind blows, I can be sure the pond will soon have a covering of leaves. It’s important when this happens that the leaves are removed as soon as possible because if they are left, they will sink to the bottom and decompose into a thick black sludge creating ammonia and making the water acidic and stagnant, killing any insect wildlife, and fish if you have them. I don’t have any fish in my pond, I prefer it to be natural and it also alleviates the necessity for a pump system which are expensive both to install and maintain. Plus, as you will see in the video, it’s pretty small.

A pond is a wildlife habitat all of its own, it will be filled with small creates, many of which you may never see, but if you put in a pond you’re responsible for looking after it and should take care of it; it will pay you back next year when the first frog spawn is laid and the life cycle of the pond starts over again. You can buy nets to cover a pond which stops leaves falling into it, but I would never put a net over my pond because it’s used every day by birds to drink from and bathe in; putting a net over it would be like setting a trap for them to get tangled in, so in my wildlife garden nets of all descriptions are definitely banned. Many years ago I put a net over some strawberries to protect them from the birds but a thrush became heavily entangled in the mesh, fortunately I was able to free it before any harm was caused. Instead I simply use a small fishing net on a can handle to scoop them out. I only have to do this on a few occasions over a short period of time to keep most of the leaves out of the pond. Then I just check it every few days to keep it clear.

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