House sparrow

Rhinoceros beetle
Beetles
October 13, 2014
Fungi
November 9, 2014
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House sparrow

House sparrow drinking water from my garden pond

House sparrow drinking water from my garden pond

House sparrows House sparrows were once very common birds found wherever people lived, but like most animals they have declined drastically in the last forty years. They live in family groups and nest close together when they can. If you live where there are still house sparrows you could try putting up a special nest box to try and attract them. What you need is one long box with separate compartments and a hole into each one. Families of house sparrows will nest in such boxes whereas most other birds would not nest so near to each other. Starlings are an exception though and if the holes are big enough you might find them occupied by starlings instead of house sparrows. Click in the 'nest box' link below to see the hole size for house sparrows.

The male has a black bib, grey crown on the head and deep brown wing feathers. The female is a more subdued brown with pale grey/brown underderside and no bib and looks more like the fledgling chicks in the pictures.

House sparrows are hole nesting birds. Their nest is made mostly of dried grass with any bits of wool, cotton or string and feathers they can find. They make an 'enclosed' nest, not an open cupped nest like blackbirds or thrushes. This makes them difficult to take video of them inside a nest box because they fill the box entirely with grass and lay their eggs in a small hollow within the grass.

They lay 4-6 eggs which are light grey or cream in colour with lots of speckles, dots and dashes of grey and brown. There can be up to three clutches laid in a year commencing in March. They will readily nest in nest boxes.

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